God of War – Give Me A Challenge

God of War – Give Me A Challenge

First off, as you may have read in the recent preview coverage, we offer four difficulty options when you start a new game, in order of easiest to the most challenging.

Give Me A Story: lets you experience the story without too much of a difficult gameplay challenge. You won’t be taking a gondola to the top of the highest peaks in all the Norse Realms, but you will have a far greater margin for error in enemy encounters.

Give Me A Balanced Experience: is the mode we’d recommend most players start with. The name says it all. We’ve tuned it to deliver a balanced, challenging playthrough.

Give Me A Challenge: is harder and less forgiving. It is recommended for players who find action games extremely intuitive, and for confident long-time God of War series veterans who’ve beat past games on harder difficulties.

God of War for PlayStation 4: Everything you need to know!

God of War for PlayStation 4: Everything you need to know!

In 2013, Sony Santa Monica decided to put Kratos, one of PlayStation’s most iconic characters, to bed so they could focus on crafting other games. With a trilogy and a handful of spin-offs starring the vengeful greek god completed and a shift in a focus on mature story driven games, Sony retired the God of War series for five years.

After assessing the series, Sony Santa Monica found a way to revive the series in a new and exciting way while sticking to Sony’s formula. Now, Kratos is set to return in a completely new way next month in a “reimagining” of the series which will be titled simply God of War.

Google autocomplete and YouTube algorithm are spoiling the new God of War

Google autocomplete and YouTube algorithm are spoiling the new God of War

If you’re looking forward to playing the new God of War, a word of advice: be extra careful around Google or YouTube, which are accidentally spoiling major plot points of the game through rogue algorithms.

Without going into specific details (since I’d like to avoid leaving you to the mercy of those same spoilers), even typing in phrases as seemingly innocuous as a character’s name brings up massive spoilers for the end of God of War as the first suggestion on Google search results. (We’ve tried this ourselves and it definitely works). And there are multiple Reddit threads complaining of similar spoilers of boss fights or crucial moments in the game through suggested YouTube videos.

It’s a tough bind for players; the twists and turns of God of War’s campaign are really best experienced in the narrative, but it’s tough to avoid spoilers when Google and YouTube are serving them up to you at the slightest provocation. And ironically, it’s the algorithm’s own design to be helpful that likely is affecting the most zealous fans — if you’re someone who had been watching trailers before release, you’re probably both the kind of person who’d least want to see spoilers and yet most likely to get served them by YouTube.

God of War Doesn’t Entirely Solve the Kratos Problem

I was skeptical. I expected this new, serious, grown-up God of War to mistake misery for maturity—to think a Kratos that’s sullen instead of angry, that’s struggling to connect with his only living son rather than seeking vengeance for his dead family, would somehow make up for the adolescent angst that has defined all these games so far. I expected it to show one asshole’s journey into being a slightly different kind of asshole. There’s definitely a lot of that to this game—early on it seems like Kratos is worried that his son won’t grow up into a merciless, rage-filled genocide machine if he shows him even the slightest bit of tenderness—but it isn’t entirely a po-faced paean to surly dads and their sad mama’s boy sons. There’s at least a bit more soul here than the name on the box would ever lead you to believe.

Here’s the gist: after slaughtering the entire Greek pantheon, Kratos beats it far north, settling in a cabin deep in Norse territory with his new wife. Eventually they’re joined by a son, Atreus; ashamed of his bloodthirsty past, Kratos decides to never let his son know about his life in Greece, or that he’s a god, and in effect turns into a stern, emotionless dad that feels like an absent father even when the whole family is literally living in a one-room shack. Eventually Kratos’s wife dies off-camera (seriously, never marry this man, all women of videogame antiquity), and he and the son he doesn’t really know have to take her ashes to the highest peak in videogameland, per her final request. Before they can leave Kratos has a major dust-up with a mysterious stranger who can’t feel any pain and is covered in rune tattoos, and who’s played by Jeremy Davies (of Lost and this ad) at his Jeremy Daviest. Who is this unknown assailant and what does he want? Could this be a harbinger of a whole new family of gods that Kratos will have to slay, one by one, but this time begrudgingly instead of lustily? Could it be anything else?

Ten Things I Wish I Knew When I Started ‘God of War’

Ten Things I Wish I Knew When I Started ‘God of War’

Players have spent a couple days with God of War after its Friday release, but I’ve had the good fortune of spending well over a week with my own review copy.

I have beaten the entire game except for a final few endgame challenges (there’s an optional boss that is literally driving me insane right now), but with 30+ hours into God of War, I think I have amassed a fair amount of wisdom that I can impart on you as you begin your journey.

In a game where your weapon and skill investments are permanent, it’s important to know what to focus on, and I have some more general tips for gameplay as well that hopefully you will find useful. I love this game to death and I hope you do too. You can figure out all this out on your own if you want, but I think you’ll want to know some of this info. Don’t worry, there are zero spoilers in this article, I made sure of it.

God of War Doesn’t Entirely Solve the Kratos Problem

I was skeptical. I expected this new, serious, grown-up God of War to mistake misery for maturity—to think a Kratos that’s sullen instead of angry, that’s struggling to connect with his only living son rather than seeking vengeance for his dead family, would somehow make up for the adolescent angst that has defined all these games so far. I expected it to show one asshole’s journey into being a slightly different kind of asshole. There’s definitely a lot of that to this game—early on it seems like Kratos is worried that his son won’t grow up into a merciless, rage-filled genocide machine if he shows him even the slightest bit of tenderness—but it isn’t entirely a po-faced paean to surly dads and their sad mama’s boy sons. There’s at least a bit more soul here than the name on the box would ever lead you to believe.

Here’s the gist: after slaughtering the entire Greek pantheon, Kratos beats it far north, settling in a cabin deep in Norse territory with his new wife. Eventually they’re joined by a son, Atreus; ashamed of his bloodthirsty past, Kratos decides to never let his son know about his life in Greece, or that he’s a god, and in effect turns into a stern, emotionless dad that feels like an absent father even when the whole family is literally living in a one-room shack. Eventually Kratos’s wife dies off-camera (seriously, never marry this man, all women of videogame antiquity), and he and the son he doesn’t really know have to take her ashes to the highest peak in videogameland, per her final request. Before they can leave Kratos has a major dust-up with a mysterious stranger who can’t feel any pain and is covered in rune tattoos, and who’s played by Jeremy Davies (of Lost and this ad) at his Jeremy Daviest. Who is this unknown assailant and what does he want? Could this be a harbinger of a whole new family of gods that Kratos will have to slay, one by one, but this time begrudgingly instead of lustily? Could it be anything else?

An ode to God of War’s Leviathan Axe

An ode to God of War’s Leviathan Axe

There are many reasons why the new God of War is good: the revamped combat, the closer camera, the astonishing single-shot perspective, or the more mature story all jump to mind. But what escalates God of War is not just nailing the big stuff, but the smaller things, too, like Kratos’s new axe. It might just be my favorite video game weapon in recent memory.

“The Leviathan Axe might be my favorite video game weapon in recent memory”

Officially dubbed the Leviathan Axe, the new blade is the signature weapon for Kratos in the 2018 reboot, replacing the fiery Blades of Chaos as his weapon of choice for slicing and dicing through the hordes of enemies that the game will throw at you. As a weapon, the axe is brutal and efficient, and you’re able to upgrade it over the course of the game. But the most important part of the Leviathan Axe is how much fun it is to use.

Part of that is due to the sheer weight each blow of the axe seems to have. Where the whip-like chained blades of previous games were almost lightweight weapons (in part helped by the more arcade-y design), you can almost feel each blow of the Leviathan Axe. Attacks with the axe knock enemies around the screen, or, as with some of the heavier blows, can cleave them clean in two. The sound design and animation go a long way to selling the Leviathan Axe, too, with a weighty thud when it hits and Kratos’ yells of exertion as he heaves the weapon.

God of War Review

God of War Review

It takes a brave developer to entirely change the formula of a long-running, highly successful series. “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” rings true for many franchises. To change the fundamentals of a series risks upsetting a fanbase that may have been around for, at times, decades. For Sony Santa Monica to change the very fabric of God of War is a phenomenal gamble – but one that, for the most part, pays off.

God of War is superb, offering a stunningly detailed and lush world built with a level of detail that makes it wondrous to explore. It also has room to breath, allowing Kratos and Atreus’ roller-coaster relationship to build into something that can almost rival The Last of Us’ Ellie and Joel. While a lot has changed for God of War, it still holds one of the most satisfying and entertaining combat systems in gaming.

God of War Valkyrie guide: Olrun (Alfheim)

God of War Valkyrie guide: Olrun (Alfheim)

Olrun, God of War’s Alfheim Valkyrie, doesn’t react well to aggressive offense. To win, you need to learn her attack patterns and unleash Kratos’ might when she’s vulnerable, recovering or distracted. In this guide, we’ll show you how to read Olrun’s attacks so you can respond and defeat her.

Fill your Runic attack meters. Begin every Valkyrie fight with back-to-back Runic attacks (L1 + R1 and L1 + R2). As Valkyries descend from their winged cocoons, they’re vulnerable. Attack then, and you’ll chip away a big portion of her health without resistance. (If your meters aren’t full, you can just stand around and wait for them to fill up.)

Fill your Spartan Rage meters. Spartan Rage does two things. The obvious one is inflict massive amounts of damage. The less obvious one is restore your health as you attack. You can use it to finish off a Valkyrie or restore your low health — or both! (If your meters aren’t full, go find some enemies to kill. You can warp right back to the Mystic Gateway.)

GOD OF WAR 4 – 15 Minutes of Gameplay Demo PS4 (2018)

GOD OF WAR 4 – 15 Minutes of Gameplay Demo PS4 (2018)

kratos thinking : “I’ll cut open it’s throat and use the tongue to choke it to death”

A spartan that killed his gods….. now he went to the north and became a viking.

I don’t know about you, but l live in a world where a PS4 gives me more reason to live than people do.

That’s the philosophy that Kratos had since Ascension. No Mercy, no apologies, just move on… improve, fight.

God of War Valkyrie guide: Olrun (Alfheim)

God of War Valkyrie guide: Olrun (Alfheim)

Olrun, God of War’s Alfheim Valkyrie, doesn’t react well to aggressive offense. To win, you need to learn her attack patterns and unleash Kratos’ might when she’s vulnerable, recovering or distracted. In this guide, we’ll show you how to read Olrun’s attacks so you can respond and defeat her.

Fill your Runic attack meters. Begin every Valkyrie fight with back-to-back Runic attacks (L1 + R1 and L1 + R2). As Valkyries descend from their winged cocoons, they’re vulnerable. Attack then, and you’ll chip away a big portion of her health without resistance. (If your meters aren’t full, you can just stand around and wait for them to fill up.)

Fill your Spartan Rage meters. Spartan Rage does two things. The obvious one is inflict massive amounts of damage. The less obvious one is restore your health as you attack. You can use it to finish off a Valkyrie or restore your low health — or both! (If your meters aren’t full, go find some enemies to kill. You can warp right back to the Mystic Gateway.)

God of War Review

God of War Review

It takes a brave developer to entirely change the formula of a long-running, highly successful series. “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” rings true for many franchises. To change the fundamentals of a series risks upsetting a fanbase that may have been around for, at times, decades. For Sony Santa Monica to change the very fabric of God of War is a phenomenal gamble – but one that, for the most part, pays off.

God of War is superb, offering a stunningly detailed and lush world built with a level of detail that makes it wondrous to explore. It also has room to breath, allowing Kratos and Atreus’ roller-coaster relationship to build into something that can almost rival The Last of Us’ Ellie and Joel. While a lot has changed for God of War, it still holds one of the most satisfying and entertaining combat systems in gaming.

Ten Things I Wish I Knew When I Started ‘God of War’

Ten Things I Wish I Knew When I Started ‘God of War’

Players have spent a couple days with God of War after its Friday release, but I’ve had the good fortune of spending well over a week with my own review copy.

I have beaten the entire game except for a final few endgame challenges (there’s an optional boss that is literally driving me insane right now), but with 30+ hours into God of War, I think I have amassed a fair amount of wisdom that I can impart on you as you begin your journey.

In a game where your weapon and skill investments are permanent, it’s important to know what to focus on, and I have some more general tips for gameplay as well that hopefully you will find useful. I love this game to death and I hope you do too. You can figure out all this out on your own if you want, but I think you’ll want to know some of this info. Don’t worry, there are zero spoilers in this article, I made sure of it.

SWORD PLAY God of War PS4 release date is TODAY – review, latest news and is it available on Xbox One?

SWORD PLAY God of War PS4 release date is TODAY – review, latest news and is it available on Xbox One?

God of War is an acclaimed hack-and-slash video game franchise from Sony’s Santa Monica Studio.

The 2018 entry to the series is simply called God of War, and lands as the eighth instalment overall.

It’s a direct sequel to 2010’s God of War III, and is generally seen as a soft reboot for the franchise.

What’s exciting about God of War 4 is that it moves on from its traditional Greek mythology into a new Norse setting.

Fixing God of War’s black border problem is simple

Fixing God of War’s black border problem is simple

I have a confession to make: I played God of War for way too long with an annoying black border on my screen. At first, I thought it might’ve been an aesthetic choice. But after asking a few friends and co-workers, I found out that it most certainly was not. I checked the in-game display settings and even cycled through different picture sizes with my TV remote — nothing was helping.

Fortunately, the fix is extremely easy, although the question still remains: Why is it only just now that the game asked me to dive into my PS4 settings? Check out our step-by-step guide so you can rid yourself of those pesky black bars forever, should you be having the same problem.