God Of War PS4 Armor: Best Epic, Legendary, And Rare Sets

God Of War PS4 Armor: Best Epic, Legendary, And Rare Sets

The latest God of War takes a different approach from past entries in the series. This time around, the game introduces RPG mechanics, allowing you equip a variety of gear that enhance a set of stats and even offer special perks. Much like the recent Monster Hunter World, your progression is tied not to experience points, but the new armor and weapons you’re able to acquire and craft.

The armor you collect comes in a variety of different styles, shapes, types, and sizes. While each armor set you has its own specific bonuses that suit different playstyles, they also offer different looks for Kratos. To give you an idea of what kind of armor sets you’ll be able to use once you’ve progressed far enough in the game, we’ve compiled across the three armor piece categories some of the best looking and most powerful sets. Click from the images below to see each piece and its respective stats.

Soapbox: Why God of War Will Scratch Your Zelda Itch

Soapbox: Why God of War Will Scratch Your Zelda Itch

Of all the games I expected God of War to remind me of, The Legend of Zelda was probably right at the very bottom of my list. I mean, how could the hallmarks of Nintendo’s flagship adventure franchise possibly be present in Kratos’ latest? This is a game about a paternal relationship, like The Last of Us. It has a cinematic third-person camera, like Uncharted. Heck, there are even thick, visually luxurious forests, like every Sony game ever according to one particularly short-sighted meme.

But no, the new God of War reminds me of Zelda – and old-school, Ocarina of Time-era Zelda at that. One of my takeaways while playing the title is that it’s got a very Nintendo-esque design philosophy to it. The ol’ Big N is brilliant at constantly introducing new systems and mechanics throughout the course of its titles, only to exchange them for something new and then reinvent them later on. God of War does that, perhaps not to the highs of, say, a Twilight Princess, but it’s there.

GOD OF WAR 4 “Behind the Myths” Trailer (2018) PS4

GOD OF WAR 4 “Behind the Myths” Trailer (2018) PS4

As someone who just recently has a son, I could not be more excited for this game. When he discussed trying to be “a better person” to become “more patient”… he’s absolutely right. It’ll hit you like a ton of bricks. Nothing gives you a stronger calling than when you have your first born.

Guys help collect subscribers stream God of war on the day of release

I get what they are doing, but at the same time they are doing it wrong. It seems like it is going to be a shitty version of Last of Us. I would of liked it better if it was more of a story about Kratos becoming Odin and his son becoming Thor.

Boy, Read This: The Internet Pokes Fun At Kratos In God of War

Boy, Read This: The Internet Pokes Fun At Kratos In God of War

For such a grim, serious and violent game, God of War sure is making people on the internet laugh.

God of War is a pleasant surprise. Playing as Kratos, the curmudgeonly dad and his precious son Atreus is both narratively satisfying and has interesting gameplay. It’s also given rise to one of my favorite current internet jokes. Please just click play on this video from YouTuber The Goose.

You see, Kratos has a habit of calling his son “boy.” A lot. This has not escaped the internet’s notice.

Boy, Read This: The Internet Pokes Fun At Kratos In God of War

Boy, Read This: The Internet Pokes Fun At Kratos In God of War

For such a grim, serious and violent game, God of War sure is making people on the internet laugh.

God of War is a pleasant surprise. Playing as Kratos, the curmudgeonly dad and his precious son Atreus is both narratively satisfying and has interesting gameplay. It’s also given rise to one of my favorite current internet jokes. Please just click play on this video from YouTuber The Goose.

You see, Kratos has a habit of calling his son “boy.” A lot. This has not escaped the internet’s notice.

God of War 4 Help Me!

God of War 4 Help Me!

God of War is one of those rare titles that define the console generation. Kratos’ fighting has been refined to its very best and the lands of Midgard are filled with wonders of all manner to explore and defeat. It’s been nearly the entire lifespan of the PlayStation 4 console since Kratos has seen new adventure but the wait has been worth it. Santa Monica Studio’s journey is still far from over, but they’ve once again shown why Kratos is one of gaming’s greatest anti-heroes.

The Gods here are more human then they’ve ever been, and there’s something as captivating about that as there was about the larger-than-life absurdity of characters like Poseidon and Hades in the original series. God of War works for what it keeps and works for what it changes. It’s a foundation for a series that’s suddenly a tentpole once again.

An ode to God of War’s Leviathan Axe

An ode to God of War’s Leviathan Axe

There are many reasons why the new God of War is good: the revamped combat, the closer camera, the astonishing single-shot perspective, or the more mature story all jump to mind. But what escalates God of War is not just nailing the big stuff, but the smaller things, too, like Kratos’s new axe. It might just be my favorite video game weapon in recent memory.

“The Leviathan Axe might be my favorite video game weapon in recent memory”

Officially dubbed the Leviathan Axe, the new blade is the signature weapon for Kratos in the 2018 reboot, replacing the fiery Blades of Chaos as his weapon of choice for slicing and dicing through the hordes of enemies that the game will throw at you. As a weapon, the axe is brutal and efficient, and you’re able to upgrade it over the course of the game. But the most important part of the Leviathan Axe is how much fun it is to use.

Part of that is due to the sheer weight each blow of the axe seems to have. Where the whip-like chained blades of previous games were almost lightweight weapons (in part helped by the more arcade-y design), you can almost feel each blow of the Leviathan Axe. Attacks with the axe knock enemies around the screen, or, as with some of the heavier blows, can cleave them clean in two. The sound design and animation go a long way to selling the Leviathan Axe, too, with a weighty thud when it hits and Kratos’ yells of exertion as he heaves the weapon.

Japanese Sales Charts: God of War Debuts in Second Place on PS4

Japanese Sales Charts: God of War Debuts in Second Place on PS4

God of War enjoyed a semi-decent opening in Japan, moving roughly 46,000 copies and landing in second place. We weren’t expecting it to do crazy numbers, but we perhaps thought that it would get a little closer to 100,000. It was beaten out by the newly released Nintendo Labo Variety Kit, which isn’t a huge surprise.

Things remain dire on the hardware front, with PlayStation 4 numbers down in the dumps. Apparently, stock shortages may play a part here, and that seems probable given that the PS4 Pro actually outsold the standard model.

God of War – Give Me A Challenge

God of War – Give Me A Challenge

First off, as you may have read in the recent preview coverage, we offer four difficulty options when you start a new game, in order of easiest to the most challenging.

Give Me A Story: lets you experience the story without too much of a difficult gameplay challenge. You won’t be taking a gondola to the top of the highest peaks in all the Norse Realms, but you will have a far greater margin for error in enemy encounters.

Give Me A Balanced Experience: is the mode we’d recommend most players start with. The name says it all. We’ve tuned it to deliver a balanced, challenging playthrough.

Give Me A Challenge: is harder and less forgiving. It is recommended for players who find action games extremely intuitive, and for confident long-time God of War series veterans who’ve beat past games on harder difficulties.

God of War for PlayStation 4: Everything you need to know!

God of War for PlayStation 4: Everything you need to know!

In 2013, Sony Santa Monica decided to put Kratos, one of PlayStation’s most iconic characters, to bed so they could focus on crafting other games. With a trilogy and a handful of spin-offs starring the vengeful greek god completed and a shift in a focus on mature story driven games, Sony retired the God of War series for five years.

After assessing the series, Sony Santa Monica found a way to revive the series in a new and exciting way while sticking to Sony’s formula. Now, Kratos is set to return in a completely new way next month in a “reimagining” of the series which will be titled simply God of War.

Google autocomplete and YouTube algorithm are spoiling the new God of War

Google autocomplete and YouTube algorithm are spoiling the new God of War

If you’re looking forward to playing the new God of War, a word of advice: be extra careful around Google or YouTube, which are accidentally spoiling major plot points of the game through rogue algorithms.

Without going into specific details (since I’d like to avoid leaving you to the mercy of those same spoilers), even typing in phrases as seemingly innocuous as a character’s name brings up massive spoilers for the end of God of War as the first suggestion on Google search results. (We’ve tried this ourselves and it definitely works). And there are multiple Reddit threads complaining of similar spoilers of boss fights or crucial moments in the game through suggested YouTube videos.

It’s a tough bind for players; the twists and turns of God of War’s campaign are really best experienced in the narrative, but it’s tough to avoid spoilers when Google and YouTube are serving them up to you at the slightest provocation. And ironically, it’s the algorithm’s own design to be helpful that likely is affecting the most zealous fans — if you’re someone who had been watching trailers before release, you’re probably both the kind of person who’d least want to see spoilers and yet most likely to get served them by YouTube.

God of War Doesn’t Entirely Solve the Kratos Problem

I was skeptical. I expected this new, serious, grown-up God of War to mistake misery for maturity—to think a Kratos that’s sullen instead of angry, that’s struggling to connect with his only living son rather than seeking vengeance for his dead family, would somehow make up for the adolescent angst that has defined all these games so far. I expected it to show one asshole’s journey into being a slightly different kind of asshole. There’s definitely a lot of that to this game—early on it seems like Kratos is worried that his son won’t grow up into a merciless, rage-filled genocide machine if he shows him even the slightest bit of tenderness—but it isn’t entirely a po-faced paean to surly dads and their sad mama’s boy sons. There’s at least a bit more soul here than the name on the box would ever lead you to believe.

Here’s the gist: after slaughtering the entire Greek pantheon, Kratos beats it far north, settling in a cabin deep in Norse territory with his new wife. Eventually they’re joined by a son, Atreus; ashamed of his bloodthirsty past, Kratos decides to never let his son know about his life in Greece, or that he’s a god, and in effect turns into a stern, emotionless dad that feels like an absent father even when the whole family is literally living in a one-room shack. Eventually Kratos’s wife dies off-camera (seriously, never marry this man, all women of videogame antiquity), and he and the son he doesn’t really know have to take her ashes to the highest peak in videogameland, per her final request. Before they can leave Kratos has a major dust-up with a mysterious stranger who can’t feel any pain and is covered in rune tattoos, and who’s played by Jeremy Davies (of Lost and this ad) at his Jeremy Daviest. Who is this unknown assailant and what does he want? Could this be a harbinger of a whole new family of gods that Kratos will have to slay, one by one, but this time begrudgingly instead of lustily? Could it be anything else?

Ten Things I Wish I Knew When I Started ‘God of War’

Ten Things I Wish I Knew When I Started ‘God of War’

Players have spent a couple days with God of War after its Friday release, but I’ve had the good fortune of spending well over a week with my own review copy.

I have beaten the entire game except for a final few endgame challenges (there’s an optional boss that is literally driving me insane right now), but with 30+ hours into God of War, I think I have amassed a fair amount of wisdom that I can impart on you as you begin your journey.

In a game where your weapon and skill investments are permanent, it’s important to know what to focus on, and I have some more general tips for gameplay as well that hopefully you will find useful. I love this game to death and I hope you do too. You can figure out all this out on your own if you want, but I think you’ll want to know some of this info. Don’t worry, there are zero spoilers in this article, I made sure of it.

God of War Doesn’t Entirely Solve the Kratos Problem

I was skeptical. I expected this new, serious, grown-up God of War to mistake misery for maturity—to think a Kratos that’s sullen instead of angry, that’s struggling to connect with his only living son rather than seeking vengeance for his dead family, would somehow make up for the adolescent angst that has defined all these games so far. I expected it to show one asshole’s journey into being a slightly different kind of asshole. There’s definitely a lot of that to this game—early on it seems like Kratos is worried that his son won’t grow up into a merciless, rage-filled genocide machine if he shows him even the slightest bit of tenderness—but it isn’t entirely a po-faced paean to surly dads and their sad mama’s boy sons. There’s at least a bit more soul here than the name on the box would ever lead you to believe.

Here’s the gist: after slaughtering the entire Greek pantheon, Kratos beats it far north, settling in a cabin deep in Norse territory with his new wife. Eventually they’re joined by a son, Atreus; ashamed of his bloodthirsty past, Kratos decides to never let his son know about his life in Greece, or that he’s a god, and in effect turns into a stern, emotionless dad that feels like an absent father even when the whole family is literally living in a one-room shack. Eventually Kratos’s wife dies off-camera (seriously, never marry this man, all women of videogame antiquity), and he and the son he doesn’t really know have to take her ashes to the highest peak in videogameland, per her final request. Before they can leave Kratos has a major dust-up with a mysterious stranger who can’t feel any pain and is covered in rune tattoos, and who’s played by Jeremy Davies (of Lost and this ad) at his Jeremy Daviest. Who is this unknown assailant and what does he want? Could this be a harbinger of a whole new family of gods that Kratos will have to slay, one by one, but this time begrudgingly instead of lustily? Could it be anything else?

An ode to God of War’s Leviathan Axe

An ode to God of War’s Leviathan Axe

There are many reasons why the new God of War is good: the revamped combat, the closer camera, the astonishing single-shot perspective, or the more mature story all jump to mind. But what escalates God of War is not just nailing the big stuff, but the smaller things, too, like Kratos’s new axe. It might just be my favorite video game weapon in recent memory.

“The Leviathan Axe might be my favorite video game weapon in recent memory”

Officially dubbed the Leviathan Axe, the new blade is the signature weapon for Kratos in the 2018 reboot, replacing the fiery Blades of Chaos as his weapon of choice for slicing and dicing through the hordes of enemies that the game will throw at you. As a weapon, the axe is brutal and efficient, and you’re able to upgrade it over the course of the game. But the most important part of the Leviathan Axe is how much fun it is to use.

Part of that is due to the sheer weight each blow of the axe seems to have. Where the whip-like chained blades of previous games were almost lightweight weapons (in part helped by the more arcade-y design), you can almost feel each blow of the Leviathan Axe. Attacks with the axe knock enemies around the screen, or, as with some of the heavier blows, can cleave them clean in two. The sound design and animation go a long way to selling the Leviathan Axe, too, with a weighty thud when it hits and Kratos’ yells of exertion as he heaves the weapon.