Wait, Why are there So Many Black People in Far Cry 5?

Wait, Why are there So Many Black People in Far Cry 5?

After spending a few weeks with Far Cry 5, I’ve come to the regretful conclusion that there are way too many black people in this game.

It’s not that I dislike black people, in fiction or in real life (full disclosure: I am black). It’s just that for a series that prides itself on realism, my experience of constantly bumping into assault rifle–toting black people in the forests of Montana just seems unrealistic.

Far Cry 5’s premise is that you’re a local deputy sent to arrest the leader of a doomsday cult that has been taking over fictional Hope County, Montana. But for some reason that’s never explained in-game, a large proportion of the cultists are black.

According to the 2016 census, black people make up just over half a percent of the population of Montana. There are only about 6,000 black people in the entire state. Does Far Cry expect me to believe that all of them moved to Hope County?

The developers have tried to explain this by saying that the cult that appears as the main enemy in the game has gotten everyone — regardless of color — to join. But that doesn’t account for the fact that even non-cultists are disproportionately black.

Far Cry 5 Offers No Insight into Christian Fundamentalism

Far Cry 5 Offers No Insight into Christian Fundamentalism

When creative director Dan Hay explained his narrative vision for Far Cry 5, he described a story that would address what he perceived to be the return of the “us vs. them” mentality in the United States. By his observation, in the last decade or so of American politics, a deep division had resurfaced to create an atmosphere of fear, or as he puts it, pressure. And he wanted to make a game about it.

This perspective, one that bears the social privilege of seeing the hostility of American politics, as Waypoint reports, as an “unrealistic experience” to build a game on, may explain why Far Cry 5 is so out of touch. Is it about cults? Is it about militias? Is it about white people and Christian fundamentalism? In a way, it’s “about” all of these things, but it doesn’t offer any insight. The player is positioned, much like Hay, to feel pressure and fear from a situation they don’t understand. And they are given no opportunity to critically engage or empathize.

As a result, Far Cry 5 completely misses its chance to offer any insight into How We Got Here, perhaps even deepening that same divide between Americans that Hay speaks of. If Far Cry 5 wanted to make a comment on our current political climate, it was as easy as doing the research. An explanation can be found not in drugs or music boxes or physical torture; mind control, as a concept, is just a fancy phrase for mental abuse. White America is already equipped with the tools for spiritual coercion, and already uses them. And that fact explains more about the “sudden” rise of the alt-right and violent conservatism than initially meets the eye.

Wait, Why are there So Many Black People in Far Cry 5?

Wait, Why are there So Many Black People in Far Cry 5?

After spending a few weeks with Far Cry 5, I’ve come to the regretful conclusion that there are way too many black people in this game.

It’s not that I dislike black people, in fiction or in real life (full disclosure: I am black). It’s just that for a series that prides itself on realism, my experience of constantly bumping into assault rifle–toting black people in the forests of Montana just seems unrealistic.

Far Cry 5’s premise is that you’re a local deputy sent to arrest the leader of a doomsday cult that has been taking over fictional Hope County, Montana. But for some reason that’s never explained in-game, a large proportion of the cultists are black.

According to the 2016 census, black people make up just over half a percent of the population of Montana. There are only about 6,000 black people in the entire state. Does Far Cry expect me to believe that all of them moved to Hope County?

The developers have tried to explain this by saying that the cult that appears as the main enemy in the game has gotten everyone — regardless of color — to join. But that doesn’t account for the fact that even non-cultists are disproportionately black.

Google autocomplete and YouTube algorithm are spoiling the new God of War

Google autocomplete and YouTube algorithm are spoiling the new God of War

If you’re looking forward to playing the new God of War, a word of advice: be extra careful around Google or YouTube, which are accidentally spoiling major plot points of the game through rogue algorithms.

Without going into specific details (since I’d like to avoid leaving you to the mercy of those same spoilers), even typing in phrases as seemingly innocuous as a character’s name brings up massive spoilers for the end of God of War as the first suggestion on Google search results. (We’ve tried this ourselves and it definitely works). And there are multiple Reddit threads complaining of similar spoilers of boss fights or crucial moments in the game through suggested YouTube videos.

It’s a tough bind for players; the twists and turns of God of War’s campaign are really best experienced in the narrative, but it’s tough to avoid spoilers when Google and YouTube are serving them up to you at the slightest provocation. And ironically, it’s the algorithm’s own design to be helpful that likely is affecting the most zealous fans — if you’re someone who had been watching trailers before release, you’re probably both the kind of person who’d least want to see spoilers and yet most likely to get served them by YouTube.

Far Cry 5: Teaser Trailer | Ubisoft [NA]

Far Cry 5: Teaser Trailer | Ubisoft [NA]

Confirmed: You have to climb a bell tower and bang some guy’s head on the bell to reveal the map.

Farcry 2: player shooting africans and destroying the african wildlife. everyone ok

Vote with your wallet don’t help politicized games like this, at least wait for its eventual steam sale for 1/2 price or less.

For The Love Of Death, The Game Is Not Going To Be About Killing Christians! It’s About Stopping A Doomsday Cult From Spreading Their Dangerous Means. The Villain Is A Guy Who Manipulates The Faithful To Worship Him As The Second Coming And To Commit Atrocities In His Name.

Wait, Why are there So Many Black People in Far Cry 5?

Wait, Why are there So Many Black People in Far Cry 5?

After spending a few weeks with Far Cry 5, I’ve come to the regretful conclusion that there are way too many black people in this game.

It’s not that I dislike black people, in fiction or in real life (full disclosure: I am black). It’s just that for a series that prides itself on realism, my experience of constantly bumping into assault rifle–toting black people in the forests of Montana just seems unrealistic.

Far Cry 5’s premise is that you’re a local deputy sent to arrest the leader of a doomsday cult that has been taking over fictional Hope County, Montana. But for some reason that’s never explained in-game, a large proportion of the cultists are black.

According to the 2016 census, black people make up just over half a percent of the population of Montana. There are only about 6,000 black people in the entire state. Does Far Cry expect me to believe that all of them moved to Hope County?

The developers have tried to explain this by saying that the cult that appears as the main enemy in the game has gotten everyone — regardless of color — to join. But that doesn’t account for the fact that even non-cultists are disproportionately black.

Peta launches campaign against Far Cry 5

Peta launches campaign against Far Cry 5

I’m not sure what exactly it is about Far Cry 5 that seems to attract all the different Social Justice factions. Just last week, a Vice journalist was complaining about the video game having too many black people. Now, the People for the Ethical treatment of animals (PETA) has issued out a press release criticizing the game’s treatment of animals.

Peta’s German division is pleading with the developers of Far Cry 5 to stop marketing their game to the German population, until they fix how animals (fishes in particular) are treated in the game. According to the press release, Peta wants video games that contain “free-living animals that do not glorify killing as a pastime.”

Since the original press release was written in German, I had to seek the help of Google Translate and a friend to translate to English. Not sure why, but the translated texts just sound hilarious.

Far Cry 5: The popular first person shooter game franchise is back, and it doesn’t disappoint

Far Cry 5: The popular first person shooter game franchise is back, and it doesn’t disappoint

Far Cry is one of the most popular FPS (first person shooter) game franchises — now in its fifth iteration, the game takes you to the fictional Hope County in rural North America. A cult called The Project at Eden Garden has taken over and it’s your job to bring those radicals in line. As a junior law enforcement officer, you’ll be referred to as ‘rookie’ or Deputy several times but rookie or not, you have to step up to the plate and not get killed while taking down countless cultists.

You have an open world to explore, a bunch of weapons at your disposal, some fun vehicles to drive and allies (including animals) that you can develop to aid your missions. Remember that you’re building a resistance, so while the game is open world, there is still a structure and narrative you have to follow. For instance, you’ll have to find and kill three lieutenants before you get to the final leader Joseph Seed.

It’s a fun time if you’re a fan of FPS games and the Far Cry formula. Thanks to all the side missions and exploring you have to, total playtime can stretch to 50 hours, even if you’re an experienced gamer. Rural America is beautifully rendered and the game is 4K enhanced too – provided you have the firepower to run it (a powerful PC, PS4 Pro or Xbox One X). That being said, the game runs fine on the standard PS4 too, just without the extra resolution and textures.

FAR CRY 5 : VAMOS INVADIR A REGIÃO DA FAITH SEED E DOMINAR TUDO : 22

FAR CRY 5 : VAMOS INVADIR A REGIÃO DA FAITH SEED E DOMINAR TUDO : 22

O rd só fais vídeo top quem concorda com Migo deixa o like.

Rd eu fis uma homenagem pra vc quando vc marreo no gta 5

X não chove lá na casa de papel eu liguei bonacasata para Paula

salve rd, estou assistindo a gravação, pq vc n usa facecam sei lá o nome disso hahaha, abraço…

Far Cry 5 Offers No Insight into Christian Fundamentalism

Far Cry 5 Offers No Insight into Christian Fundamentalism

When creative director Dan Hay explained his narrative vision for Far Cry 5, he described a story that would address what he perceived to be the return of the “us vs. them” mentality in the United States. By his observation, in the last decade or so of American politics, a deep division had resurfaced to create an atmosphere of fear, or as he puts it, pressure. And he wanted to make a game about it.

This perspective, one that bears the social privilege of seeing the hostility of American politics, as Waypoint reports, as an “unrealistic experience” to build a game on, may explain why Far Cry 5 is so out of touch. Is it about cults? Is it about militias? Is it about white people and Christian fundamentalism? In a way, it’s “about” all of these things, but it doesn’t offer any insight. The player is positioned, much like Hay, to feel pressure and fear from a situation they don’t understand. And they are given no opportunity to critically engage or empathize.

As a result, Far Cry 5 completely misses its chance to offer any insight into How We Got Here, perhaps even deepening that same divide between Americans that Hay speaks of. If Far Cry 5 wanted to make a comment on our current political climate, it was as easy as doing the research. An explanation can be found not in drugs or music boxes or physical torture; mind control, as a concept, is just a fancy phrase for mental abuse. White America is already equipped with the tools for spiritual coercion, and already uses them. And that fact explains more about the “sudden” rise of the alt-right and violent conservatism than initially meets the eye.

Far Cry 5 Offers No Insight into Christian Fundamentalism

Far Cry 5 Offers No Insight into Christian Fundamentalism

When creative director Dan Hay explained his narrative vision for Far Cry 5, he described a story that would address what he perceived to be the return of the “us vs. them” mentality in the United States. By his observation, in the last decade or so of American politics, a deep division had resurfaced to create an atmosphere of fear, or as he puts it, pressure. And he wanted to make a game about it.

This perspective, one that bears the social privilege of seeing the hostility of American politics, as Waypoint reports, as an “unrealistic experience” to build a game on, may explain why Far Cry 5 is so out of touch. Is it about cults? Is it about militias? Is it about white people and Christian fundamentalism? In a way, it’s “about” all of these things, but it doesn’t offer any insight. The player is positioned, much like Hay, to feel pressure and fear from a situation they don’t understand. And they are given no opportunity to critically engage or empathize.

As a result, Far Cry 5 completely misses its chance to offer any insight into How We Got Here, perhaps even deepening that same divide between Americans that Hay speaks of. If Far Cry 5 wanted to make a comment on our current political climate, it was as easy as doing the research. An explanation can be found not in drugs or music boxes or physical torture; mind control, as a concept, is just a fancy phrase for mental abuse. White America is already equipped with the tools for spiritual coercion, and already uses them. And that fact explains more about the “sudden” rise of the alt-right and violent conservatism than initially meets the eye.

Petition Calls for Ubisoft to Change Far Cry 5 Villains to Muslims or Change Setting to Canada

Petition Calls for Ubisoft to Change Far Cry 5 Villains to Muslims or Change Setting to Canada

An organization calling themselves “Gamers United” has posted a petition on change.org, asking Ubisoft to heavily alter, or else cancel, Far Cry 5. The reason? They hate that the game makes a villain out of religious white people. “Far Cry 5 is an insult to your fanbase,” the petition reads, “the Americans who make up the majority of your customers, and it’s time you woke up to that fact. Change this, or cancel it.”

The entire petition, which at this point boasts almost 500 signatures, seems almost too stereotypically “far-right conservative” to be real. We’re thinking it may be a work of brilliant satire, especially because of lines like this one: “Us Gamers have had to endure a lot of crap over the last few years. The targeted harassment by the mainstream press through Gamergate, the terrible launch and outright lies of highly anticpated video games, the outright censorship of art through ‘localization’ policies, the continued rejection of romantic partners when they find out our hobby…”

You’re kidding me, right? This has to be a joke. If this isn’t a work of art intentionally crafted to provoke conversation, then we’re not even sure what to think. If you can believe it, the peition gets even more absurd and even more shocking. Below we’ve listed a few of their more outrageous demands.